Category Archives: Thompson

Ephraim Thompson: Reviewing the Crumb Trail

If you have stuck with the Thompson BSOs over the last nine days, I congratulate you. If you are expecting to now see the proof of these relationships appear before you, I am afraid you will be disappointed.

All is not hopeless though because I believe in the no-stone-left-unturned process. I believe my theory about Ephraim Thompson’s wife and children is sound and I also believe that my tentative family group for Laurence Thompson and an unknown wife as Ephraim’s parents is also sound.

Therefore, three Thompson generations can be listed as:

Generation I –  Laurence Thompson, born c1740; died after 1810 census and his unknown wife

 Generation II – Children:

  1. Ephraim, born c1771; married Sarah Curry, daughter of William Curry on 18 October 1798, Mercer County, KY; died before 13 September 1847, Howard County, Missouri. Ephraim was ordered to help maintain the roads in 1793, so I assume that he was 21 by that time.
  2. Margaret, born c1774; married Emmer Stalcup, 25 March 1792, Mercer County, Kentucky. Her father gave permission for the marriage, so she was under 21 and thus born in 1772 or a little later. Margaret was enumerated in the 1810 census of Washington County, Kentucky, but is not found after that time.
  3. David, born c1775; married Malinda Neville, 7 December 1796, Mercer County, Kentucky; died 2 June 1821, Callaway County, Missouri, per probate records (Volume A:13) Malinda was reportedly born 30 January 1778, Tryon County, North Carolina; died 29 January 1869, Lake County, California. David is tentatively placed as a son of Laurence Thompson because (1) he is the right age (2) he is on the same removal list as Ephraim from Mercer County in 1798 and (3) he also migrated to Missouri at an early time. Callaway County was set off from Montgomery County in 1820. Then and now Callaway County borders Boone County, where Ephraim Thompson also owned land. (4) Ephraim apparently married (2) to Isabella Jones in 1842, Boone County, Missouri. They had one son, born c1847, who was named David, perhaps for Ephraim’s deceased brother.
  4. Grace, born c1779; married Henry Landes/s, 25 February 1799, Washington County, Kentucky, with the name of her father, Laurence Thompson recorded on the record.
  5. George, born c1782; possible son because one George Thompson took on Samuel Scott as an apprentice on 1 January 1812 to learn the art of draper. Samuel W. Scott married Sarah Thompson, presumed daughter of Ephraim and Sarah (Curry) Thompson on 26 February 1821 in Howard County, Missouri

There may well have been one or more other children of Laurence Thompson, but their identities are still hidden in the records of Washington and Mercer Counties, Kentucky!

Generation III – Children of Ephraim Thompson and Sarah (Sally) Curry Thompson

  1. Annie, born c1800; died c1829, probably Howard County, Missouri; married James Holland, 27 November 1818, Howard County, Missouri.
  2. Elmore, born c1802; died before 13 September 1840, Howard County, Missouri; married Martha (Patsey) Smith, 25 February 1830, Boone County, Missouri.
  3. Sarah, born c1805; died after 1850, probably Howard County, Missouri; married Samuel W. Scott, 26 February 1821, Howard County, Missouri.
  4. Hannah, born c1810; died after 28 August 1870, probably in Howard County, Missouri; married William Alexander, 10 January 1833, Boone County, Missouri
  5. Elias, born 1805-1810; died 23 April 1877, Howard County, Missouri; married Permelia Smith, c1835, but no record found. The 1850 census has Ann K. Smith, probably Permelia’s mother, aged 72, living with the family.

My next trip to the Family History Library will focus on identifying children/descendants of Laurence’s children, Margaret, David, Grace and George and to take a fresh look at Thompson land records in Mercer and Washington Counties. Now that I have at least an inking of an idea of several of Ephraim’s (maybe) father and siblings, there is a much better chance of sorting out all these people, especially with some help from probate records and court minutes.

If one looks at this Thompson cluster’s FAN club and if Laurence Thompson hailed from any of the same places as the families into which his children married, there is still a lot of research to do. The Stalcup family was from New Castle County, Delaware. The Holland/Hollin family came from Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Henry Landes was from North Carolina. Permelia Smith’s probable mother, Ann K. Smith, was born in Virginia. Sarah Curry’s family lived in Augusta County, Virginia. Mark and Grace Arnold (Ephraim was executor of her estate) were from King George County, Virginia. Those are a lot of places to check with no guarantee that Laurence and Ephraim Thompson were from any of them.

Will I ever have proof of Ephraim Thompson’s descendants and ancestors? I don’t know, but I am certainly not ready to give up yet. Thank you for hanging with me through all of this – there is still more to come!

 

Is Laurence Thompson Part of the Bigger Picture?

Hints have begun to crop up in this saga about Ephraim Thompson possibly being related to Laurence Thompson and daughters Grace who married Henry Landers/Landes in 1799 and Peggy, or Margaret, who married “Amer” Stalcup in 1792. When Amer or Emmer died about 1805, Ephraim Thompson served as the estate administrator. Peggy is clearly identified as the daughter of Laurence Thompson in her marriage record.

What documentation can be found involving Laurence Thompson? Like Ephraim, he didn’t leave behind many crumbs.

Based on the estimated ages of four possible children, Laurence Thompson was probably born in the early 1740s. Where is as much of a mystery as the birthplace of his children. Unlike his probable children, no marriage record has been found for any Laurence Thompson anywhere.

Laurence sold land in Mercer County, Kentucky to Peter Titsworth in 1795 (DB 5:305) and to Peter (Brocan?) in 1797 (DB 3:243). No biographical or familial data is to be found in either of those land deeds.

By the early 1800s, Laurence was residing in Washington County, Kentucky. John Davis of Mercer County sold 225 acres of land on Beech Fork for £227 to Laurence Thompson of Washington County. (DB B:686) Beech Fork is the same area in which Ephraim Thompson lived.

The 1800 census of Kentucky is lost and Laurence isn’t enumerated in 1810, but I believe that is a mistake. Take a look at this:


? Thompson, Washington County, KY in 1810


Enlarged view

This person is at the end of the T section on the census, in which the enumerator grouped everybody together by surname instead of enumerating neighbors. This person is indexed as Samuel, which I don’t believe is correct. First, that given name is way too long to be Samuel. Second, I haven’t come across any other records for a Samuel who would be over 45 years of age, which this man was:

02001-0011

This household had a male and female, each over 45, one female aged 156-26 and 2 males aged 10-16.

I believe this is the household of Laurence Thompson.

Laurence does not appear in the 1820 census of Kentucky, nor is he in the 1830 census of Missouri. There are no will or other probate records for him filed in Mercer or Washington Counties.

Furthermore, Ephraim last appears in the county records in 1813. Remember, Price Arnold, son of Grace Arnold, whose estate Ephraim executed, was said to have arrived in Missouri by about 1812. The Arnold family either migrated with him or soon after and I suspect the Thompson clan moved en masse from Washington County about the same time.

There are no probate records for Howard County, Missouri before 1818. Much to my chagrin, I believe Laurence Thompson died between 1810 and 1818, probably in Missouri or on the way there.

What is the configuration of Laurence Thompson’s family? With an unknown wife, he likely had at least four children who survived to adulthood and married:

  1. Ephraim, born c1771; married Sarah Curry, daughter of William Curry on 18 October 1798, Mercer County, KY; died before 13 September 1847, Howard County, Missouri. Ephraim was ordered to help maintain the roads in 1793, so I assume that he was 21 by that time.
  2. Margaret, born c1774; married Emmer Stalcup, 25 March 1792, Mercer County, Kentucky. Her father gave permission for the marriage, so she was under 21 and thus born in 1772 or a little later. Margaret was enumerated in the 1810 census of Washington County, Kentucky, but is not found after that time.


Mercer County, KY Marriage, 1792
Source: FamilySearch


1810 Census, Washington County, Kentucky
Source: Ancestry

Amer and Margaret apparently had a son, born c1794, two daughters born 1795-1800 and three more daughters born 1800 to 1806, if all are children of Amer/Emmer.

There is an Emmor Stallcup who married Nelly Stallcup on 13 September 1821 in Washington County, Kentucky.


Marriage of Emmor Stallcup & Nelly Stallcup, 1821
Source: FamilySearch

This Emmor is said to be the son of Henry Stallcup, brother-in-law of Margaret Stallcup, and born c1789 or 1790. Henry and Emmor Stallcup were the only two known family members who lived in Washington County. Emmor obviously didn’t marry his sister, which means Nelly was probably the daughter of Emmor and Margaret.

I have not been able to find a second marriage record for Margaret Thompson Stallcup or any probate record for her and I don’t know what became of any of the children in her 1810 household.

3. David, born c1775; married Malinda Neville, 7 December 1796, Mercer County, Kentucky; died 2 June 1821, Callaway County, Missouri, per probate records (Volume A:13) Malinda was reportedly born 30 January 1778, Tryon County, North Carolina; died 29 January 1869, Lake County, California.

David is tentatively placed as a son of Laurence Thompson because (1) he is the right age (2) he is on the same removal list as Ephraim from Mercer County in 1798 and (3) he also migrated to Missouri at an early time. Callaway County was set off from Montgomery County in 1820. Then and now Callaway County borders Boone County, where Ephraim Thompson also owned land.

4. Grace, born c1779; married Henry Landes/s, 25 February 1799, Washington County, Kentucky, with the name of her father, Laurence Thompson recorded on the record.


Gracy Thompson marriage to Henry Landess, 1799
Source: Ancestry

The Landess family migrated to Lincoln County, Tennessee, where Henry and Grace were still living in 1850.


1850 Census
Source: Ancestry

Although this census record says she was born about 1779 in North Carolina, a Goodspeed biography on their son says his parents were born in North Carolina and Kentucky, respectively. On the other hand, in the 1880 census, the same son reports both parents were born in North Carolina. Who knows, but 1779 would be quite early for a birth of a white child in Kentucky so perhaps this is yet another bread crumb to follow on the Thompsons.

5. ?George, born c1780 – There appear to be at least two contemporary George Thompsons. There is a George Thompson recorded in Washington County, Kentucky deed records (D:93) who, on 9 March 1812, agreed to take on Samuel Scott, aged 15 on 1 January 1812, named as the natural son of Alley Scott, deceased, as an apprentice to learn the art of draper. I believe this Samuel Scott, born 1 January 1797, per the apprenticeship record, is the Samuel W. Scott who married Sarah Thompson in Howard County, Missouri on 26 February 1821. There is no probate record for this man and it is possible he migrated with other Thompsons about 1813.  There are three marriages which might pertain to this man. George C. Thompson married (1) in Mercer County on 8 May 1806 to Sally Thompson (2) again in Mercer County on 21 August 1809 to Mary W. McDowell. There is also a George Thompson who married Biney Blandford on 6 December 1806 in Washington County. Biney was born c1784 in Maryland. She married (2) James Brewer, 17 October 1818, Nelson County, Kentucky. Nelson County borders the western side of Washington County.

Where do I go from here? Let’s review tomorrow.

Early Thompsons in Mercer and Washington Counties, KY

My head was spinning with Thompsons last spring when I wrote several posts about them. I decided my brain needed some relief, so I left them for a while.

I decided it was time to take another look at the pile of notes I’d accumulated. Here are my findings, but I’m pretty much back to the brain spinning again.

As I delved into Kentucky county records, the first mention I found anywhere of Ephraim Thompson is in a list of court orders of Mercer County, Kentucky dated 24 December 1793. On page 68, Ephraim Thompson, among many others, is ordered to help Alexander McClure to open and keep a road in good repair. I would assume from this that Ephraim was at least 21 years old at the time, putting his birth around 1771, which I think is fairly accurate.

Next, in the Stray Book and Tax Record, Mercer County, Kentucky 1787-1806, on page 193, there is a list of Removals and Insolvents dated 1798. On the list are David Thompson, Ephraim Thompson, John Thompson and a second John Thompson, all with one levy.

Ephraim Thompson married Sally Curry on 18 October 1798 in Mercer County, but after 1798, he appears in Washington County, Kentucky. Washington County was organized in 1792, so that would imply that Ephraim didn’t happen to reside in a section of land which formed a new county, but that he moved to Mercer’s neighboring county. I don’t know if he was closely related to the other Thompsons, but I suspect that he was related to at least one Joseph Thompson.

That is because William Curry, Ephraim’s father-in-law, left an estate that was probated in 1801. One of the appraisers was Joseph Thompson and among the estate records was the notation that William held a note on “Evan Thompson.”

However, in spite of the fact that Ephraim removed to Washington County, I need to carefully examine ALL the Thompsons in Mercer and Washington Counties as a number of them are mentioned in records found in both places.

Next, a look at the Thompson land deeds in Mercer and Washington Counties was overwhelming. A quick scan for “heirs of” or other similar clues was negative, but I need to revisit those deeds in a future Family History Library session. I did find several references to Ephraim, though.

As mentioned in a previous post, Ephraim Thompson was mentioned as a witness or neighbor in several lands that also involved  William Crowdus. Remember, William Crowdus married Dolly Arnold and Ephraim was executor of the estate of Dolly’s mother, Grace Arnold.

Hmmm! Maybe another clue – One Lawrence Thompson sold land to Ephraim in 1804, but no relationship was stated. Witnesses were William Baxter, Edward Briscoe and John Gray. Both were of Washington County.

In 1811, Ephraim Thompson was a witness to a land sale where Joseph Howdershell and wife Mary sold land to William Crowdus.

These lands were all on Beech Fork.

Marriage records were next on the list. Besides Margaret’s 1792 marriage to Emmer Stalcup, I also found:

Marriages in Mercer County:

Evan Thompson to Chloe Bennett, 25 April 1792
Ephraim Thompson to Sallie Curry, 18 October 1798
Arthur Thompson to Martha Cochran, 4 April 1795
Roger Thompson to Betsy A. Shields, 24 November 1798
David Thompson to Malinda Newell, 7 December 1798
Elizabeth Thompson to Jonas/James Williams, 5 April 1798

Marriages in Washington County:

Gracy Thompson to Henry Landes, 25 February 1799; father named as Laurence Thompson
Sally Thompson to John Gray, 3 January 1803

There are many, many other Thompson marriages in these two counties from 1785 to 1815, but these are the only records that caught my eye. I don’t know that any of the other Thompsons in Mercer County are related to Ephraim, but Gracy and Sally could easily be younger sisters of Ephraim. Gracy is identified as the daughter of Laurence and a John Gray witnessed the land sale from Lawrence Thompson to Ephraim Thompson in 1804.

The next building block in this house of cards is Laurence/Lawrence Thompson. Stay tuned for the next chapter in this saga!