Tag Archives: David Stufflebean

Ahnentafel of David Lee Stufflebean

I am just as excited when I find a new cousin in the Stufflebean line, so here is Dave’s ahnentafel.

Generation 1

1. David Lee Stufflebean

Generation 2

2. Edward Earl Stufflebean
3. Ruby Jewel Sturgell

Generation 3

4. Earl Marcus Stufflebean, b. 1894, Linn Co., MO; d. 1946, Oklahoma City, OK
5. Pearl Lillian Brasher, b. 1898, Sulphur Springs, TX; d. 1989, Norman, OK
6. Oscar Eldon Sturgell, b. 1893, Barry Co., MO; d. 1968, Anadarko, OK
7. Ethel Anne Nation, b. 1900 Oakley, TN; d. 1976, Los Angeles, CA

Generation 4

8. John H. Stufflebean, b. 1863, Linn Co., MO; d. 1939, Noble, OK
9. Mary E. Hollen, b. 1868, Sullivan Co., MO; d. 1905, Garner, MO
10. Joseph H. Brasher, b. 1874, Cumby, TX; d. 1925, Noble, OK
11. Minnie Mae Williams, b. 1879, Hopkins Co., TX; d. 1945, Hillsboro, TX
12. Abijah Houston Sturgell, b. 1855 ; d. 1905, both in Barry Co., MO
13. Martha Susannah Alberty, b. 1858, Newton Co., MO; d. 1916, Barry Co., MO
14. Clayton C. Nation, b. 1872, Cumberland Co., KY; d. 1922, Granite, OK
15. Matilda Jane Dulworth, b. 1869, Cumberland Co., KY; d. 1931, Granite, OK

Generation 5

16. John Stufflebean, b. 1821, Estill Co., KY; d. 1864, Nashville, TN
17. Matilda M. Peavler, b. 1836, Knox Co., KY; d. 1900, Linn Co., MO
18. James Holland, b. 1824, Sullivan Co., MO; d, 1903, Linn Co., MO
19. Eramanthus Elizabeth Scott, b. c1827; d. after 1870, MO
20. Emsley Harrison Brasher, b. 1841, Christian Co., KY; d. 1886, Cumby, TX
21. Mary Woosley Perkins, b. 1846, Cedar Co., MO; d. 1882, Cumby, TX
22. John C. Williams, b. 1848, Lafayette Co., AR; d. 1926, Dike, TX
23. Louisa Miller, b. 1842, Muhlenberg Co., KY; d. 1883, Hopkins Co., TX
24. Isaac Sturgell, b. c1823, prob. Grayson Co., VA; d. 1909, Barry Co., MO
25. Mary Bandy, b. c1828, Lawrence Co., OH; d. aft 7 Mar 1889, prob. Peoria Co., IL
26. John S. Alberty, b. 1818, Surry Co., NC; d. 1861, Newton Co., MO
27. Susannah Douthit, b. 1821, Rowan Co., NC; d. 1883, Newton Co., MO
28. Joseph M. Nation, b. 1836, prob. Fentress Co., TN; d. 1906, Overton Co., TN
29. Christianna Riddle, b. 1833, Cumberland Co., KY; d. 1923, Overton Co., TN
30. Abraham Dulworth, b. 1840, Cumberland Co., KY; d. aft 1910, prob. Cumberland Co., KY
31. Mary Jane Adams, b. c1850, TN; d. 1932, Granite, OK

Generation 6

32. Michael Stufflebean, b. c1798, Estill Co., KY; d. 1848, Linn Co., MO
33. Elizabeth Baker, b. c1801, KY; d. 1850, Linn co., MO
34. Lewis Peavler, b. c1805, TN; d. aft 1880, prob. Sullivan Co., MO
35. Catherine Head, b. c1810, prob Scott Co., VA; d. aft 1880, prob. Sullivan Co., MO
36. James Holland, b. c1791, KY; d. aft 1860, prob. Sullivan Co., MO
37. Annie Thompson, b. c1793; d. bef 1830, prob. Howard Co., MO
40. Hampton Brasher, b. 1818, prob. Christian Co., KY; d. 1864, Civil War
41. Altezara Jane Woodruff, b. c1820 ; d. bef 1848, both prob. Hopkins Co., KY
42. Samuel H. Perkins, b. 1821, Halifax Co., VA; d. 1905, Cedar Co., MO
43. Martha Hamby, b. 1826, Christian Co., KY; d. 1891, Cedar Co., MO
44. William Alexander Williams, b. 1808, Roane Co., TN; d. 1866, Lafayette Co., AR
45. Hepsabeth Davison, b. 1811, VA; d. aft 1870, prob. Hempstead Co., AR
46. Michael Miller, b. 1815, Muhlenberg Co., KY; d. 1880, Hopkins Co., TX
47. Elizabeth Hendricks, b. 1818, prob. Warren Co., KY; d, 1875, Hopkins Co., TX
48. William Sturgill, b. c1785, prob NC; d. bet 1844-1850, AR or MO
49. Sophia King, b. c1785; d. bef 12 Mar 1839, prob. Lawrence Co., OH
50. Andrew Bandy, b. 1784, VA; d. 1867, Lawrence Co., OH
51. Rebecca Wooldridge, b. 1799, VA; d. 1879, Lawrence Co., OH
52. John Henry Alberty, b. 1772, NC; d. aft 1850, prob. Washington Co., AR
53. Rebecca, b. c1782, NC; d. aft 1860, prob. Washington Co., AR
54. Abraham Douthit, b. 1797, NC; d. 1863, Newton Co., MO
55. Valinda Jarvis, b. c1799, rowan Co., NC: d. aft 1830, possibly IN
56. Henry Nation, b. c1814, Preble Co., OH; d. aft 1860, possibly Arkansas Co., AR
58. Isaac Riddle, b. c1800, VA; d. aft 1880, prob. Cumberland Co., KY
59. Catherine Johnson, b. c1803, TN; d. aft 1880. prob. Cumberland Co., KY
60. James Dulworth, b. c1805, Knox Co., TN; d. 1887, Cumberland Co., KY
61. Elizabeth Gwinn Spear, b. c1817, Cumberland Co., KY; d. 1878, Cumberland Co., KY

If you compare my ahnentafel to Dave’s, it isn’t likely you will find any common lines! Our ancestors had totally different origins and in different areas of the country. Again, if you see a distant cousin, please leave a comment.

First Came Jasper, Then Came Jenny and Keesha Followed

Yesterday, I shared the story the day that Jasper and Jenny met their new housemate, Keesha, the frisky, loving puppy. If you remember, I also mentioned that while my family always had a pet or two, Dave was allergic to animals. His family had three children, but was devoid of animals. So how did my allergy-prone husband end up with not one, or even two, but three pets in the house???

We had been married for a very short time when I made my usual weekly trip to the local supermarket to pick up some groceries. That day in June 1979, was different, though, because a young family was there trying to find homes for several tiny kittens. They claimed the kittens were six weeks old, but they were very, very small. I think they were likely 4-5 weeks old and really not old enough to be taken away from their mother.

However, the kittens were up for adoption and I have always had a weakness for gray tabby cats – and there was one very cute little gray tabby in the litter. That little cutie came home with me. Dave took one look at her, said he was allergic to cats and she wasn’t ever coming in the house. Well, that lasted about two days. He named her Jasper, which was the name of the street on which we lived, and she quickly settled into her new life.

Jasper loved being with both of us and it turned out that Dave had outgrown his childhood allergies. Being around her wasn’t any problem at all. Jasper had a habit that reinforced my belief that she was less than six weeks old when she came home with me – she loved to knead on me, whether it be against my skin or on my clothing. She also loved to cuddle and be petted.

She was definitely the queen bee of the household. There were no pesky kids or other animals and she could roam the house at will. Jasper even went on day trips with us, as friends didn’t mind having her visit with them. Since she was an indoor pet, when she was outside, she always had on a harness and leash. She wasn’t fond of them, but she tolerated them.

In June 1980, we decided that Jasper needed a playmate while we were gone all day at work. I think a friend told me about a family that had kittens who needed a home. Again, I was the instigator. When I visited the family and had a chance to pick one of the kittens – there were four or five as I remember – another gray tabby caught my eye and Jenny came to live with us.

Unlike the day that Keesha came home, we didn’t think to take a picture when Jasper met Jenny, but let’s just say that Jasper wasn’t a happy camper. She wanted nothing to do with this intruder and immediately jumped up on a counter where Jenny couldn’t reach her. The next morning, I put down food for each of them in separate bowls. Jenny happily ate her breakfast. Jasper, who was always quite high strung, ate some of her breakfast and then crossed the kitchen and promptly regurgitated her food all over Jenny.

That was the worst of it, though. Slowly, they became friends and Jenny was ecstatic when she could climb the ladder that Jasper went up to get away from her.

Jenny on the Ladder
Jenny, Summer 1980

Their personalities were quite different, as was their physical build. Jasper was a big cat – about 14 lbs. as an adult, but not overweight. Jenny was  very petite and only weighed 7 lbs. Jasper was the more nervous of the two, but Jenny was a lot more feisty. Eventually, they became best buds and were always together.

Jenny & Jasper Cuddling
Best Friends

They often slept curled up together and looked like one giant cat.

Jasper & Jenny Sleeping Together
Jasper & Jenny

Their lifespans were equally different. Jasper died when she was only nine years old, of a liver infection, in October 1988. Jenny lived until just past her 20th birthday, passing away in April 2000.

Keesha was the wildcard in this mix. She was one of the sweetest, most loving pets anyone could ever wish for. She was a lot more interested in hanging with the cats than they were in having her around. She was also “my” dog. She stuck to me like glue, sitting at my feet until I moved somewhere. Then she got up and followed. At night, she slept next to my side of the bed.

Linda with Keesha
Keesha

Keesha was also a great earthquake alarm. I think dogs hear something that humans don’t. Living in California, we experienced several earthquakes. When they happened at night, Keesha would growl before shaking began. The first time it happened, I awoke and wondered if a prowler was nearby, but then I felt the shaking.

Now, Keesha was “my” dog except in one instance. That instance was when my mother came from New Jersey to visit. Then, she dropped me like a hot potato and became Grandma’s pet.

Doris Holding Keesha
Keesha Meeting Grandma

Keesha had a great memory – she remembered the constant attention and love my mother gave her. She also remembered all the bits of dinner that my mom slipped to her under the table!

We paid a professional trainer to help us train Keesha. She was a great guard dog. When our son was born and people came to the door, she was very protective of us. I could also take her outside with me to garden in the front yard. People and other animals could walk by us up the street (which had no sidewalks.) Keesha would sit right at the curb and bark at them, but would never go off the curb into the street unless I told her it was okay. Once I asked a neighbor who was home during the day if Keesha ever barked. We didn’t want her annoying the neighbors. Our neighbor said she rarely heard Keesha barking, but if she did hear her, she always went to investigate because it ALWAYS meant that a stranger was somewhere outside.

Keesha had one strange habit, though. We bought a beautiful, very good sized doghouse for her and put in on our backyard patio. It turned out that she rarely went inside it – we never figure out why – but until she grew too big to fit there, she loved to scrunch herself into the space between the back of the doghouse and our house!

Keesha Behind her Dog House
Keesha Behind the Doghouse

Keesha was with us until just past her 13th birthday. As she got older, she seemed to have a bit of trouble getting her back half up and moving from a sitting position. The vet said it was likely arthritis. However, just after Christmas in 1998, Keesha starting having a major seizure. We rushed her to the animal hospital, but she didn’t make it. Afterwards, the vet said he thought she might well have had a brain tumor that grew slowly, affecting her ability to get up and eventually bringing on the seizure.

As I reminisced while writing this post, I remembered a funny story about Keesha, whom we often called “Keesh.” Our son was probably six or seven at the time and, as I worked in the kitchen, he wanted to know what we were having for dinner that night.

My reply: quiche.  What he heard: Keesh!

I had to quickly explain the difference between the two as he thought the dog was going to be the main course. Oddly enough, while we rarely have quiche for dinner, we had it tonight and it’s been a long time since I thought of that story.

Jasper, Jenny and Keesha were well loved members of the Stufflebean family and they are very much missed.