Saturday Night Genealogy Fun: Your Favorite Toys As a Child

It is Saturday, so time for some more SNGF with Randy Seaver.

1)  Jen on Auntie Jen’s Family Trees posted “Throwback Thursday Favorite Toys” on 23 January, and Linda S. thought it would make a good SNGF topic.  I agree!

2) What are some (one or more) of the toys you played with as a child?  

There are four toys I can remember vividly, so they are probably my favorite toys I had as a child.

First, I loved my Patty Playpal and wrote about her last month for SNGF, as her arm got broken, she went to the doll hospital and Santa brought her back to me.

Second, while I still liked dolls, was Barbie. I remember she had a black vinyl case to store her and her clothes. Barbie was first sold on 9 March 1959 and I think I had one not that longer afterwards. One of my friends had a Barbie, too, and we used to play together with them. I remember my friend had Barbie’s wedding gown (!) for her doll. It was beautiful, but if I remember correctly, it cost a lot! If it was $10 back then, that is an equivalent of about $85 in today’s money. Somewhere in my mind, I think the dress was even more outrageously price at $25, or about $215 today. Needless to say, my Barbie never had a wedding gown!

Third, I loved to ride my bicycle, which is the same white and pink Schwinn seen in the link to the previous SNGF fun above because I got it that same Christmas. My friends and I spent hours riding miles and miles of streets around Passaic. We quickly learned how to ride “up” the curbs so we didn’t have to stop and get off our bikes every time we crossed a street.

Lastly, I think I was about ten when walking on stilts became the neighborhood rage. Mine were red wood and had plastics steps for our feet. After a bit of practice, we could all walk around the block on them without falling.

Thanks Auntie Jen, and Randy, for this childhood throwback challenge.

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