My 2016 Technology Resolutions

Are there new products you’d like to try out, but don’t seem to have the time? Have you discovered new websites into which you’d really like to delve, but haven’t gotten around to it? I have!

This year, I decided to make a separate resolution list to cover various websites and software programs that I already own, but have made little progress in gaining much of any proficiency.

My second list, below, is somewhat linked to #2 in my 2016 Genealogy Resolutions that posted a couple of days ago, but it goes further than just choosing a new software program.

Somewhere along the way while I was discovering and, for lack of a better word, hoarding my new technology treasures, I started keeping a list so I could remember what I had. Currently, I have a baker’s dozen of items on it. A few of my treasures are simply websites or programs that I need to remember to use/review so they stay fresh in my mind. The others are software programs that will take some practice to retain information.

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To Do List
Source:
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I am definitely a “list” kind of person and I do well keeping to defined schedules, so here is my plan for 2016.

Websites and programs in blue font indicate the first time they are on the calendar. Green font indicates live links to the website.

January – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Browse MyHeritage for new contacts. Try building a new tree in Family Historian 6. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7 users group.

February – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Use Evernote at RootsTech and in the Family History Library. I’ve used Evernote before, but so much time passes in between that I forget what I’ve learned. Continue with Family Historian 6 and try out Scrivener. Scrivener is a great product for story boarding and organizing one’s thoughts when preparing to write. The nice thing about the 30 day trial version is that it isn’t 30 calendar days, it is 30 different days of usage so if I start something on Monday, but can’t get back to it until Thursday, Thursday would only be Day 2. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic users group.

March – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6. Try out Ancestral Quest 14 software program. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic users group.

April – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6 and Ancestral Quest 14. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic users group.

I purposely have not introduced any new items in May or June. However, I am retired and, if I keep to this schedule, I might find that I am ahead of myself. If so, I will move up the new items as time allows.

May – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6 and Ancestral Quest 14. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7 users group.

June – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6 and Ancestral Quest 14. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7 users group.

July – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6 and Ancestral Quest. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7  users group. Try out Heredis 2015.

August – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6, Ancestral Quest 14 and Heredis 2015. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7 users group.

September – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6, Ancestral Quest 14 and Heredis 2015. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7 users group. Try out GenDetective.

October – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6, Ancestral Quest 14, Heredis 2015 and GenDetective. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7 users group. Try out Evidentia.

November – First week update Pinterest and History Lines. Continue with Family Historian 6, Ancestral Quest 14, Heredis 2015, GenDetective and Evidentia. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic 7 users group. Try out Legacy 8.

December – By now, I should be well used to updating Pinterest and History Lines. I will also have had extended time to try out GenDetective and Evidentia. Continue with Family Historian 6, Ancestral Quest 14, Heredis 2015, RootsMagic 7 and Legacy 8. Attend the Pima County Genealogy Society RootsMagic users group.

By the time New Year’s Eve rolls around, I should easily have made my decision as to which genealogy software program will become my new #1.

If you are a regular user of any of these many programs, please leave a comment letting me know what you like best about each one. Thank you!

 

 

 

 

Family Historian 6, Citing Sources

Today, I am taking just a very quick look at source citation in Family Historian 6. First, I have to be honest and make a confession. I have never used source citation templates in any genealogy software program I’ve used. Don’t get me wrong and misinterpret my message – I am not saying I don’t cite my sources. It’s just that all those years of term papers in school left their mark and I prefer to cite my sources in notes, using a bibliography-type style.

I can fully appreciate having source templates ready to go, but sometimes they are a bit over the top. Recently, a question was asked online about how to cite images found on ArkivDigital, the Swedish company. My idea of a complete citation is one which gives the information I need to go find the same documentation. I replied to the ArkivDigital question by explaining how, with the image page open, to go to EDIT and click on the first choice – Copy Source Identifier. That link includes all the information needed for anyone using ArkivDigital to immediately go to that specific record. Very simple and it takes but a second to paste the information into notes or a template.

Other than adding the website, archivdigital.net, to me the source citation was complete. The person thanked me, but then shared a customized citation that was totally different. That is making way more work for oneself than is necessary, but I digress.

Family Historian has more than one way to create source citations. Being a newbie using this program, I am going to make an effort to try out their source citation window in the Property Box.

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Source Citation Box, Yellow in Right Corner

My first attempt to add a citation didn’t go too well because I tried to enter information into the yellow box.

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Source Citation Box

My problem was that I missed the green + button. When I clicked on that, a second box opened and I needed to then click NEW.

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NEW, Center Button in Bottom of Gray Box

I was then able to add citation information:

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New Source Record Box

Here is a screen shot of just the data box:

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New Source Record Data Entry

I attached a death certificate for my grandfather, Vernon Adams, and then entered information in the New Source Record box. Because I had already completed this task before I wrote this post, I needed to access the record. That was accomplished by clicking on the blue arrow (noted with the red arrow) in the Property Box.

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Property Box

Here is the saved information. Note that the yellow box has no entry access point because this record has already been created. Now, I can edit, if I so wish:

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Saved Record

If you look at the gray box above for a New Source Record, I can give the record a title and even a shortened title. I can identify the type of record (e.g. Vital Record or Death Record). If this information had been published in a magazine article, I could record the author’s name and in which magazine, etc. it was published. I could enter text and create my own notes about this information. I could also enter information about the repository location, which I did for Vernon’s death certificate.

At this point, you are likely thinking that this is a very basic template for source citation and you would be correct. Does this program offer anything more?

Remember, I commented that there are multiple ways to accomplish the same task in Family Historian? Well, an English blogging friend told me to be sure to download ANCESTRAL  SOURCES in the FHUG forum, which I promptly did.

Now, for me, who never uses citation templates, my head began to spin. For those of you who love them, I imagine you might think you just landed in citation template heaven.

A Family  Historian user, Nick Walker, has created Ancestral Sources, which not only is downloadable in FHUG, but it also has its own website. 

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Ancestral Sources

Remember, too, that in an earlier post, I mentioned that Family Historian tech-oriented users create plug-ins that are accepted for use in Family Historian? Ancestral Sources is a utility for which a plug-in has been created.

By adding the Ancestral Sources plug-in to Family Historian, completing source citations is made much easier. Notice in the description that even WITNESS roles can be cited.

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Ancestral Sources Description

I won’t even pretend to have delved into all of this, but for those of you who are interested in more details about Family Historian and Ancestral Sources, just click on the links in the text above.

This is the last of my introductory steps into Family Historian 6 and I am more than sold on it. I may post occasional updates in the future as I find new features and develop some proficiency using FH 6. I have barely even touched on all that the program has to offer. In fact, I just read a blurb where it even has a web clipping tool built into it.

I hope that my newbie visits learning about this software have tickled your fancy, too. One last pitch – you can try out the 30 day free trial of the full program, with all the bells and whistles, if you are thinking that this might be the genealogy software program for you.

If you decide to try it out or are already a confirmed Family Historian 6 user, I would love to hear your observations about the program so please leave a comment.

 

 

New Toy- WordPress Plug In – Genealone

UPDATE: I loved Genealone, but decided to uninstall it, as it hasn’t been updated in over a year. If a new version becomes available, my tree will be posted back online.

A while back, I saw mention of Genealone, a WordPress plug-in that would display a family tree. I actually learned about it from a post that Dick Eastman had on EOGN. It wasn’t free, but I decided for $12, I wanted to try it out. Like some of the other technology BSOs I have purchased, it sat for a while. I wasn’t sure how it worked or what it might do on my blog site, so I didn’t do much of anything.

While reviewing all the “stuff” I’ve downloaded, purchased and/or wanted to try out, I decided now was the time to seriously look into Genealone. By chance, Colin Spencer posted a YouTube video on installing the WordPress plug-in (Genealone can also be used to create a family tree on a regular website, not just a blogging site) on 15 December. It is only four minutes long, but it showed me what to do and showed the results. That was enough to give me the confidence to activate the plug-in and upload a GEDCOM.

Because I have 7500 people, 4000+ images and notes in my tree, I chose to upload only facts, no images and no notes. I also privatized living people before I created the GEDCOM.

My family tree now has its own page on this blog. Just click on the link under the header and this home page will appear:

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Kucharik/Sabo-Adams Family Tree Page

The tree is searchable, either with the Search box or by clicking on Last Names. Right now, there is nothing to be found in Gallery, Documents or Pages, by my own choice.

The Relationships chart will show direct line family connections:

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Relationship Chart

The Timeline moves by century, not by person, but shows all individuals who lived during the time period displayed.

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1600’s Timeline

Looking at this in a practical manner, I think the most useful choice is the Last Name search, particularly if a reader wanted to find out more about ancestors mentioned in a post. However, if you have family members who read your blog, these other links are a fun way to have them look at their own family tree.

Please take a moment to check out my new Kucharik/Sabo-Adams Family Tree and let me know what you think.